Barlow, BiteClub, Cheap Eats, Mexican/Latin, Sebastopol

A Lesson in True Mexican Cuisine at Sebastopol’s Barrio Fresca Cocina

Pork belly torta and fresh tortillas? New Sebastopol Mexican is spot on

Why isn’t there more great Mexican food in Sonoma County? There, I said it. You know we’ve all been thinking it for years.

It’s not for lack of talent, because just about any restaurant you visit — from fine dining to casual — has a cook from Oaxaca or Mexico City or the Yucatan who learned their trade from parents and grandparents who ground their own masa, spent days cooking mole or any of the other seven great sauces of the country, not to mention braised meats and hundreds of heirloom beans that rarely make it across the border. Or at least, out of the home kitchen.

Rich in culinary history and tradition, Mexican cooking has so much to offer beyond burritos and quesadillas. Sadly, however, most of what we eat in local taquerias are sad approximations of street food slathered with rubbery cheese, sad salsas and overcooked meat piled onto tasteless tortillas. It’s like America’s diverse cuisine being represented by Costco hot dogs and French fries.

Polenta at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD
Polenta at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD

Thankfully we have a handful of chefs dedicated to changing how we think of Mexican food: Mateo’s Cocina Latina, Agave Restaurant and Tequila Bar, El Molino Central, and now Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center.

One of the most popular destinations at the Marin Civic Center’s Farmer’s Market, Carlos Rosas’ Barrio market stand has been a sell-out spot since 2013, serving heirloom corn tortillas, black rice, painstakingly-made sauces and a crave-worthy polenta that usually sells out by 9a.m. Now, Rosas’ and his wife, Mayra, have opened a brick and mortar featuring their most popular dishes throughout the week.

Standing at the entrance to the humble spot between Nectary Juice Bar and Village Bakery, Carlos serves as greeter, interpreter and chef at the Sebastopol Barrio. Dishes here deserve a bit of explaining: Achiote sauce, for one, or salsa de Chile Seco; Frida Kahlo microgreens he picked up at the market this morning, or the homemade chorizo mixed with salsa de chile Morita. Take the time for a lesson in history and culture that will make every bite all the more delicious.

Choriloco taco at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD
Choriloco taco at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD

Here are some explanations of a few special recipes we tried at Barrio…

Achiote sauce: This chicken marinade uses annatto seeds from the achiote tree to color it bright red. Mixed with cloves, Mexican oregano, cumin, garlic and citrus zest, it can be purchased pre-made and is typically found in dishes like cochinita pibil, tacos el pastor and chorizo. Rosas makes it from scratch.

Salsa de Chile Seco: Basically “dried chile” salsa, here made with chipotle chiles that are compressed and roasted, then cooked slowly with garlic and tomatoes. Most people think its a black mole, says Rosas. With a smokey, bittersweet dark chocolate flavor it’s a like wrapping yourself in an old lovers’ leather motorcycle jacket.

Salsa de Chile Morita: Compressed jalapeños and chiles are aged for 30 days, then roasted with tomatillos and tomatoes. Sassy and spicy, threatening to incinerate our paper plate.

As an alum of some of San Francisco’s top restaurants — Jardiniere, Cavallo Point, Kokkari, Zuni and Slanted Door — Rosas has a passion not just for recipes, but for ingredients. Fresh, non-GMO corn masa is mixed with chiles and salsa to create red, black, and green tortillas that taste like…tortillas. Rosas works with local farmers and ranchers including Stemple Ranch, Spring Hills Jersey, Liberty Farms, Devil’s Gulch and Toscano Family Farm spices.

Staff at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD
Staff at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD

The operation is a family affair, with Carlos’ mother as director of kitchen operations and his son behind the stove, continuing cherished traditions. “Every day we get better, every day we try harder,” he says.

Best Bets at Sebastopol’s Barrio:

Sunday is a great day to check out Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, because it’s the only day Carlos makes some of his signature brunch offerings: Grits, Choriloco and the El Mananero. The grits (polenta) is worth the trip alone. Portions are large and perfect for sharing.

– Grits ($12): Creamy polenta made with sharp cheddar cheese from Point Reyes, plenty of butter, and cornmeal, topped with scrambled eggs, salsa de Chile Seco and (for an additional $3) the best carnitas we’ve ever tasted. And by best, we mean tender, intensely spiced and with a hint of orange that’s such a treat in this often flavor-free fried pork. (Sunday only)

– Choriloco ($12): I’ve hated chorizo for years, mostly because it’s usually very greasy, very over or under spiced and adds pretty much nothing to a dish. Barrio’s homemade chorizo adds the perfect accent to a breakfast taco with scrambled eggs, melted cheese curds, pumpkin seeds, potatoes and Chile Morita atop a fried red corn tortilla. (Sunday only)

– Trust Me Taco, ($9): A daily special, which we suggest you just trust. Our version was a red corn tortilla with black rice and scrambled eggs, with chile seco and aji chiles.

Torta at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD
Torta at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, a walk-up cantina that recently opened in Sebastopol’s Barlow Center. Heather Irwin/PD

– Torta El Chavo ($12): This is a sandwich you won’t soon forget. Traditional torpedo bread piled with crispy pork belly, creamy chipotle aioli, pico de gallo and not-too-fatty, not-too-lean pork belly from Devil’s Gulch ranch. Stake your claim on this one early, or you’ll be facing down an empty plate and a friend with a guilty grin on their face. And a few incriminating dribbles of aioli.

– Escabache ($5): Carrots, onions, and cauliflower are pickled and fermented for 30 days, making them a worthy side for any of the tacos or plates. Simple, yes. Worth $5, yes. 

The spot: Kid-friendly quesadillas and tacos available for the less-adventurous tots. Outdoor patio seating or to-go.

The takeaway: An authentic, yet unpretentious find in a sea of taqueria sameness.

Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana: 6760 McKinley St., Suite 120, Sebastopol, 707-329-6538, barlow.barriobayarea.com. Open Monday through Saturday from 11a.m. to 8p.m., Sunday from 11a.m. to 6p.m.

Subscribe Now!

Comments

12 thoughts on “A Lesson in True Mexican Cuisine at Sebastopol’s Barrio Fresca Cocina

  1. Mexican food was one of the last holdouts to chi-chi foo-foo culinary silliness. Now it has been polluted as well. Escabeche is complimentary in all mexican restos. Charging 5 bucks is like charging for the salt and pepper on the table.

    Que triste.

  2. I will not pay $9.00 for any taco, when there are many more choices available that are just as good or better for less than half that price. This is another Barlow tourist rip-off. Have you eaten or shopped at any of the Barlow establishments? Over-priced, over-hyped, all of them.

    1. I had the tacos at Barrio Fresca Cocina Mexicana, and they are worth every penny. Carlos is making some authentic, flavorful, delicious Mexican food. Plus Carlos came outside and asked us how are food was, then gave us a sample of his home made Mole. It was out of this world. If you like Mole, you have got to try it here. He doesn’t make it every day, but find out when he does, it’s worth it. It seems folks are worried about the prices, but if you want some high quality food, some authentic and creative Mexican, pony up because it’s THAT GOOD. Not pretentious but friendly and authentic. Say hello to Carlos, he’s got a good thing going there. Locals should be proud.

  3. how incredibly ignorant an attempt to denounce all the local taqueria’s this area has to offer. The foods offered here at this restaraunt are not really “authentic” as you claim. I’ve been to the yucatan area, and oaxaca area, and while there are similar ingredients, this place just adds the “flavor” that’s the demographic in sebastopol deems acceptable. I guarantee that you can find that many mexican taqueria’s or restaurants are thriving because of their quality of food. Whomever wrote this weak, unjustified article, should find another job, because being a food critic is not one of them, go become a PR person for every restaurant that pays you.

  4. bite club insulting many many Mexican family style eateries in Sonoma county…..why because they don’t have 9. tacos.? please you have no clue how many fantastic authentic small nonpretentious places are dolloped throughout the county. take a minuet to step off that high horse and maybe you will enjoy some….jezzz

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read previous post:
10 Cutest Dogs in Sonoma County

Get ready for cuteness overload!

Close