BiteClub, Cookies, Holiday Cookie Contest

Grandma’s Butter Cookies

The best butter cookie recipe of the 2014 BiteClub Holiday Cookie Contest

butter cookie recipe
Grandma’s Butter Cookie, the winner of the 2014 BiteClub Holiday Cookie Contest

EDITOR’S NOTE: Multiple bakers have had issues with this recipe. I’m working on getting this sorted out with Karey, who baked them with us on site at the Bake-A-Thon using the recipe she submitted. Until we’ve resolved it, please hold off on using this recipe. Apologies.

butter cookie recipe
Grandma’s Butter Cookie, the winner of the 2014 BiteClub Holiday Cookie Contest

The 2014 Holiday Cookie Contest Winner: Grandmas’s/Mom’s Butter Cookies

Submitted by Karey Barnett

1 lb softened buter
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
2 1/4 flour

Heat oven to 350. In a stand mixer (my mom still does it by hand) cream butter and sugar. Add egg then vanilla and cream together. Next add flour one cup at a time and cream together. Once all ingredients are combined (now here’s the tricky part) the cookie dough is spooned into a cookie press with the crinkle disk.

Pump dough onto cookie sheets in long strips about 4 per sheet. Cut into desired size approximately 3 long and sprinkle with colored non perils. Bake for approximately 10 minutes or until golden brown on the edges. Remove from cookie sheet immediately before they begin to crisp or they will stick. You may use parchment paper if you like.

Karey says: “These are the best delicate crisp cookies ever and with colored sprinkles they are a kids/adults delight to the eyes I am still to this day drawn to beautiful colored sprinkled goodies. My mom has been making these cookies since I can remember and my grandmother before her. I still use the cookie press that was my mom’s because it makes the cookies the perfect thinness. I will let you know that this cookie press is no longer made and even harder to find. I know this because my mom and I have spent hours searching for them online. Not too long ago a friend of my mothers was going through her mothers things and found the exact cookie press still in the original box untouched. She gave the press to my mom because over the years had enjoyed these butter cookies…and to my delight, at that time my mom passed down her cookie press to me and I no longer had to borrow, it was great! I have tried to use other cookie presses, but the cookies come out to thick and do not bake as well. Growing up my mom would spend hours baking and freezing these cookies every holiday and still does today. They are requested by many and enjoyed plenty. As I began to bake these delicious crisp buttery cookies, they soon became a favorite amongst my friends as well. I call them the “perfect coffee cookie” and when you dunk them in a fresh cup of hot coffee morning or night you will know why. These cookies still keep their crunch and then melt in your mouth and it is way to easy to consume many because of how thin, crispy, and addicting the cookies are. I often tell my mom that someday we will become famous for these cookies and they will be in every coffee shop in town.”

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Comments

8 thoughts on “Grandma’s Butter Cookies

  1. I followed the recipe and I believe it should be 1 cup of butter not 1 pound. Perhaps someone else has mentioned this and I missed it but they spread all over the place. What a waste of almost $5.00 worth of butter. Looked at other butter cookie recipes when I couldn’t figure out what I did wrong. Does anyone know if the recipe is correct as written?

  2. Although married to a reporter, back when newspapers actually had copyeditors, my mother shunned newspaper recipes, no matter how mouth-watering the pictures or tempting the descriptions. Recipe quality was sadly untrustworthy and results were unreliable, she maintained. It was just too easy for a temperature to be wrong, a decimal point inserted where it didn’t belong or for a key ingredient to be left off a long list of necessary supplies.

    So I applaud with flour-coated hands and agree with KD’s perfectly reasonable request for improved copy-editing. Especially in a food column, flippin’ blog or not. Because if the words aren’t right, how can the quantities be trusted?

    Yes, these certainly sound and look good. The proportions *seem* about right. Yup, I bet I can bake these safely, with non-peril (sic), er, nonpareils. But to be certain, I’ll pull out my cookbook instead. A pound of butter is just too expensive to take any chances.

  3. Sounds Delicious! My mom does a variation on this recipe with some lemon zest for a very subtle flavor…..one of my favorites during the holidays. Kudos to Heather for the colorful sprinkles.

  4. Sounds like a great recipe – I will definitely have to try it.

    Now – on to whoever typed this. Terrible editing! Missing spaces throughout the recipe (before parenthesis, after periods) – butter is incorrect in the ingredient list. First letters of a sentence are not capitalized. Seriously? I am not even an “A” student in English and I know how to type (or edit) better. Please – before you post items online – run the whole article through Microsoft Word at least! (oh and “Grandma’s” should not have an extra s – unless it is both grandmas – which it doesn’t sound like it is – it sounds like it was her mother, and her mother’s mother – which would be one single grandma.)

    Please – in the future – proof articles. Someone that wants to save this article is going to have something that is written terribly. Unless they take the time (like I did) to correct it.

    1. Editing is a luxury, darling. This blog is only me, Heather. My friend and I cooked 22 of the 29 recipes over two exhausting days, I bought all the ingredients, photographed and edited the pictures, wrote the article for the newspaper, and then posted each recipe online copying and pasting the originals (mostly in my free time at night). While doing my day job, which isn’t this. Im super sensitive about this project because it is such a huge undertaking for me. I fixed the obvious typos. #gimmeabreak

      1. Heather,
        Want you to know I appreciate your efforts. It sounds like a lot of work. Also, want you to know what I am doing with this recipe. My brother is a cook (he doesn’t use the term chef as he thinks it is pretentious for what he does) in Montana. He cooks for a local fine dining establishment on the week-ends and prepares breakfast, lunch and dinner at a local rest home every day as well as meals for the local jail. This is a small town. I’ve just finished writing his Christmas Card and letting him know how special it is to be in a profession where you provide sustenance to people. Three meals a day and the fuel for all we do. The people in the rest home love deserts and he has become energized to provide good deserts to them. His specialty is steaks so he is on a learning curve with deserts. I thought these recipes you tried out and recommend will be great for him and thus I am sending him those I think he will enjoy making. So Thank you again and know there are those of us who know what it takes to do what you do and appreciate it.

    2. Seriously? Get over it, it’s a flippin blog submission not an advanced placement English test……the recipe is perfectly clear and I for one totally appreciate and love Heather’s blog!

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