BiteClub

Vote for our farmer’s markets!

After seeing Food, Inc. on Friday night (and feeling upset and queasy through the whole thing), figured a good way to turn around some of my negative karma points would be to let ya’ll know about this opportunity to help our local markets.

In conjunction with Local Harvest, Care2 is giving away $5000 to a top local food market based on votes. Take a second and vote for Santa Rosa, Sebastopol, Windsor or Healdsburg — whatever your favorite happens to be. (Read my April article on the markets).  And feel happy inside.

Add your vote: http://www.care2.com/farmersmarket

Subscribe Now!

Comments

15 thoughts on “Vote for our farmer’s markets!

  1. I vote for Sonomas Farmers Market on Tuesday nights. They always have music, great produce, friendly people, tons of food from Thai to mexican to Italian. The locals and the visitors bring in tons of business afterwards for the local merchants.. it’s a great market all around. The entire community comes together, picnics and plays frisbee, you can bring your wine and enjoy in the park. It’s the best!

  2. I hate to say it but that person named Fred that loves Berkeley/SF so much should just go back there. I’m sick of the people that can’t afford to live there coming out here and thinking Sonoma OWES them something. Quit complaining! It’s CHEAP enough back in Oakland! Go home!

  3. Can you really compare markets in the densely populated bay area with the ones in Sonoma County? The amount of people that populate a market in those areas make it worth it for farmers to travel from all over California to sell to the consumer. Not the most local food-buying experience, but, to your credit, much better than shopping indiscriminately at the supermarket.
    It’s tough to think that one is getting a variety of produce every week of the year from farmers in your immediate area, especially when your immediate area is highly urbanized. These markets are well stocked because they attract larger farmers that can afford to drive long distances for a large volume of people. Our markets reflect the quality of small farmers, growing in necessary proximity to these markets, mostly because these farmers can’t afford to drive too far to serve consumers. On top of that, shopping with them encourages a rural land use and character that is increasingly difficult to maintain, especially in this county. If this means a greater produce cost than you can bear, so be it–voting with your feet/dollars is vital and it’s great that you’re shopping with the good folks at Imwale Gardens. But realize that when you shop in a Sonoma County market, you’re getting something greater than what can afford to be trucked into Berkeley.

  4. the farmers at the occidental farmers market frequently ask the managers for suggestions as to what to grow, and we often tell them the same thing: ask your customers. that’s the beauty of your local farmers market–developing relationships with the people who grow your food. if you want to see something at your local market, talk to the farmers; chances are good you’ll find someone who’s interested in growing it. and ask the farmers how they set their prices; you might be surprised to learn what goes into that number. most try their best to set them fairly.

  5. the farmers markets in sonoma county have a far more substantial presence of local farmers than those in the east bay, south bay, and san francisco–all markets which have a larger percentage of farmers who are coming from the central valley to sell their produce. and the bottom line? it’s a lot more expensive to farm in sonoma county than it is to farm in the central valley. if you support local farmers, you’re money goes a lot further than just your plate–you’re supporting the preservation of farmlands in your own backyard. and buying local means buying what’s in season–you’re not going to find the same selection from sonoma county farmers, who have a far different growing season, than those from the central valley.

  6. I really like the Windsor Farmers Market on Sundays. Its small enough to get through in about 30 min but the variety is great. Get a cup of coffee at Cafe Noto and then stroll around with your basket, it’s a nice way to spend a sunday morning!

  7. I have to agree with Fred. I used to shop the Petaluma market. Past couple of years I have tried both Sat. and Wed. markets. I walk away each time realizing the prices are quite simply outrageous. I’m not talking organic either, $2.50 for a single beefstake tomato is too pricey, the same with blue/black and raspberries, 3.99/5.00 per basket. The local grocery store is cheaper and the quality just fine, every time. Sad, the markets are fun but they have priced themselves out of my business.

  8. I have to agree with Fred. I used to shop the Petaluma market. Past couple of years I have tried both Sat. and Wed. markets. I walk away each time realizing the prices are quite simply outrageous. I’m not talking organic either, $2.50 for a single beefstake tomato is too pricey, the same with blue/black and raspberries, 3.99/5.00 per basket. The local grocery store is cheaper and the quality just fine, every time. Sad, the markets ar fun but they have priced themselves out of my business.

  9. How do you suggest customers “get involved” in improving the seller’s product?
    Usually, a customer does this by “voting with his feet”, taking his business elsewhere until the seller gets the point: “I need a better product at a better price”.
    That’s what I did by going to Imwale Gardens on West 3rd Street.
    If you have a SPECIFIC idea how one can otherwise “get imvolved” to obtain a better product at eastbay prices — or comparable prices to Imwale — please do give us the specifics.
    I’d love to see Sonoma County have the selection and prices people in the eastbay and on the peninsula take for granted. So, Mr. Downtown, tell me how we do that.

  10. Thanks Jenny for the tip on the Bohemian Farmers Market in Occidental. Sounds like a great experience and nice way to start off the weekend.
    Cheers!

  11. Easily the Bohemian Farmers Market has the best vibe. Its like a street party with great food, entertainment shopping.

  12. How about getting involved with improving the markets?
    It sure is easy to say what is wrong with this world but it takes a whole lot more work to improve it. And ya get better results.

  13. My favorite is the market in the Vet’s building parking lot.
    The organic produce is a bargain and the conventionally farmed stands are downright cheap. Not too mention most of the vendors have at least one unusual item every week.
    Vendors already have a wide variety of tomatoes from early girl to heirlooms. Saturday the first corn was in.
    The Patch from the town of Sonoma has had some beautiful sweet onions not too mention a variety of beets.

  14. How ’bout “none of the above”?
    I moved from the eastbay a little over a year ago. The one disappointment of the move (OK, 2 disappointments counting the unemployment rate) is the farmers’ markets. In the eastbay, I went every week, 12 months a year. Two great ones in Berkeley, another at Jack London Square, a good one in Castro Valley, and a good ethnic market in Fremont. And, occasionally, one could go to Alemany Market in SF — the best of them all.
    It seemed logical to assume the farmers’ markets up here would be equally appealing. WRONG! The prices are higher than grocers — when the eastbay markets are all lower. The selection can’t approach the eastbay; neither can the quality or freshness.
    After trying Santa Rosa fairgrounds & downtown, Sebastopol, and Windsor, I gave up. I haven’t been to a local farmer’s market since last July. Thank goodness for Imwale Gardens!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read previous post:
Casa Del Mar

Casa Del Mar

Close